Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
. >> wheas i said earlier, when dean collins was asking me about the risks of some of our policies, i was pointing out that inflation is very low. it is below the 2% target. unemployment is above where it should be. there seems to be this strong presumption that we should be aggressive and monetary policy. that does make the case for being aggressive, which we're trying to do. the additional point i made was that the short-term interest rate is close to zero. we are now in the world of nonstandard mentor policies. -- monitor policies. -- monetary policies. we have to pay close attention to the costs and risks of these non standard policies, as well as potential economic benefits. to the extent there are costs and risks associated with non standard policies, economics tells you when something is more costly, you do less of it. we are being bred accommodative, working very hard to try it -- we are trying to be accommodative. in trying to think about what the right policy is, we have to think not only about the macroeconomic outlook, but the costs and risks associated with the individual
of the economy when making decisions that are more aggregate? >> thank you, dean collins, first, for joining the detroit branch. people probably don't know, unless you have been studying this, but every federal reserve bank around the country, but 12 reserve banks and a good number of additional branches, each one has a board of directors drawn from the private sector. it could be academics, it could be businesspeople, it could be community leaders, nonprofits, organizers, and so on. we draw these people in primarily to give their input and their insight. this is a very large and complex economy. there are many different sectors. it's very helpful to us to have people from -- leaders from different parts of the economy, from different parts of the country providing this input and giving us somebody to bounce ideas off of, to help us make a better decision and understand what's going on. so that's very useful. i attended part of the meeting this morning with the detroit branch and i heard from a number of people about the auto industry, health care, academics, industry, a variety of things. s
. >> first, thank you, dean collins for joining the detroit branch. people probably don't know that you have been studying this, but every federal reserve banks around the country, there are 12 reserve banks, and a good number of additional branches, each one has a board of directors drawn from the private sector to be academics, it could be business people, could be community leaders, nonprofits organized and so on. and we draw these people in primarily to get their input and their insight. this is a very large and complex economy. there are many different sectors, and it's very helpful to us to have people from, leaders from different parts of the economy, from different parts of the country providing this invite, and giving us somebody to bounce ideas off of, to help us make better decisions and understand what's going on. so that's very useful, and i attended, at least part of the meeting this morning with the detroit branch, ma and i heard from a number of people about the auto industry, health care, academics, industry, a variety of things. so that's actually very useful. now, in terms
professor susan collins. she's the dean of the school of public policy at the university. she told the washington post that she does plan to ask him about this quantitative easing qe 4 debate inside the fed. she also plans to ask him about the fed's new targets for when it might start to raise interest rates. it says it won't start doing that as you know now until unemployment gets to at least 6 1/2% or until inflation gets to -- if it hits 2 1/2%, then they would start to tighten. for the first time, the fed chairman is going to take questions through social media, through twitter, but not through the fed's handle, through a handle that the school has established, specifically for this event. we will be on our twitter account as we watch the questions come up. cheryl: peter, i follow the federal reserve on twitter. it is probably the most twitter feed, not lying. they have to step up their game a little bit. if you know people over there, let them know. peter: i will pass your complaints along to management. cheryl: please do. thank you very much. peter barnes, and of course we wi
. the same way -- there was a very important step, dean collins will remember this, used to be that years ago, way long time ago, if you were an academic, and you wrote a paper, then you had to submit it to a journal, took two years, got published, and, you know, it was three years after you wrote the paper before anyone knew what you were working op, and then came the internet and working papers and so on, and pretty soon, you know, papers were available almost immediately for professional evaluation. even that, of course, involved the long delay involved in doing the research and writing the paper and so on. what if you had a shorter perspective? a shorter idea that you wanted to put out there? well, again, the internet has provided useful ways for people to communicate, to discussion monetary policy, and i follow a lot of baseball blogs myself, actually. [laughter] that's just the next step in creating conversation among people. you know, i think that's been constructive so there are a few federal reserve blogs. the fed has one. the new york fed has one, and we have twitter, we have facebo
bit late. and the first question out of the box here from the dean of the ford school of public policy at the university, susan collins, her first question on the fiscal cliff. so now big headlines there yet from the fed chairman. but we are awaiting for potential comments on monetary policy, specifically professor collins told the washington post that she does plan to ask chairman bernanke about the news that came out of the fed minutes a couple of weeks ago that there's this internal debate among fomc members on whether or not to start pulling back quantitative easing, to start cutting back on all those trillions of dollars in bond purchases we have seen over the last few years. sometime this year, which was a little bit unexpected, to the financial markets. and there are now it appears a majority of members who might want to do that either earlier this year or by the end of the year. so that will be the -- those will be the headlines we will be looking for. david and sandra? sandra: thank you peter barnes. when you have anything, just jump in, we will take you live. we will break th
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6